Press Releases

It's a Beautiful (and Expensive) Day in the Gayborhood

The premium for a home in a gayborhood can be nearly four times the typical home value, but some cities see a discount

May 23, 2019

SEATTLE, May 23, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- In most major cities in the United States, homes in gayborhoods are worth more than the typical home – in some cases several times more.

To identify gayborhoods across the country ahead of Pride Month, Zillow® analyzed data from the American Community Survey to find which neighborhoods have the highest share of same-sex couple households compared with others in the areai.

The neighborhood with the highest share is North Banker's Hill, San Diego, where 10.1 percent of households are same-sex couples. The North Banker's Hill housing premium is about 25 percent – the typical North Banker's Hill home is worth $792,400, compared with the citywide median value of $632,600.

West Palm Springs in California has the second-highest share of same-sex couple households at 9.2 percent, but homes there come with a much higher premium. Homes in West Palm Springs are worth more than three times as much as the typical home in the broader Riverside metro.

In fact, there are 10 major cities where home values in the gayborhood are more than double the community at large, including Houston, Charlotte and Philadelphia. That's not to say home values are necessarily higher simply because it's the gayborhood. Other factors could be driving the premium; gayborhoods are often close to amenities like bars, restaurants, and job centers.

There are a few places where gayborhoods buck this trend. In the downtown area of San Jose, Calif., homes are worth 38.1 percent less than the typical San Jose home. The area also has the smallest share of same-sex couples in the analysis at 1.1 percent. Gayborhoods in San Antonio and Kansas City have a similar discount on housing.

"The narrative of gayborhoods as a signal for rapid home value appreciation and gentrification has been around for decades, with Greenwich Village and the Castro long held up as examples," said Zillow Director of Economic Research Skylar Olsen. "Today, the story is a little different. While these neighborhoods still foster a sense of community and social acceptance, living within them often comes at premium many may not be able to afford. This has a disproportionate effect on intersectional LGBTQ people —not just gay, but a person of color, transgender, a woman—those who are disadvantaged when it comes to earning potential."

Housing Market
(by city unless
specified)

Gayborhood

Percent Same-
Sex Couples

Typical
Gayborhood
Home Value

Typical
Home
Value

 Premium

New York

West South-Central
Manhattan (Upper West
Side to West Village)

3.4%

$1,478,149

$681,600

116.9%

Los Angeles
County

West Hollywood

4.8%

$822,200

$618,600

32.9%

Chicago

Edgewater to Lakeview

3.7%

$299,506

$230,400

30.0%

Dallas

Oak Lawn

2.3%

$322,900

$217,000

48.8%

Philadelphia

Area surrounding
Lombard-South Station

3.5%

$550,048

$160,900

241.9%

Houston

Neartown - Montrose

2.9%

$514,000

$187,800

173.7%

Washington, DC

Logan Circle and
surrounding areas

4.0%

$697,200

$580,100

20.2%

Miami-Fort
Lauderdale Metro

Wilton Manors

8.8%

$374,200

$284,900

31.3%

Atlanta

Midtown

3.0%

$305,700

$261,200

17.0%

Boston

Meeting House Hill
(Dorchester)

7.9%

$640,600

$603,600

6.1%

San Francisco

Castro

8.6%

$1,767,128

$1,353,500

30.6%

Detroit Metro

Pleasant Ridge

5.6%

$330,100

$162,200

103.5%

Riverside Metro

West Palm Springs

9.2%

$1,229,500

$369,200

233.0%

Phoenix

South Central Encanto

6.4%

$442,400

$242,600

82.4%

Seattle

Central District (Minor,
Madison Valley, Leschi)

3.0%

$729,911

$726,500

0.5%

Minneapolis

Bryn Mawr

7.6%

$406,000

$267,900

51.5%

San Diego

North Banker's Hill

10.1%

$792,400

$632,600

25.3%

St. Louis

Shaw - South Grand

3.8%

$238,126

$119,500

99.3%

Tampa-St.
Petersburg Metro

Southeast Gulfport

7.6%

$236,700

$214,300

10.5%

Denver

Golden Triangle

4.2%

$512,700

$394,735

29.9%

Portland

Northwest, West of
23rd

6.3%

$850,100

$425,500

99.8%

Charlotte

Plaza Midwood

4.7%

$470,800

$225,500

108.8%

Sacramento

Northern Land Park

2.6%

$553,900

$327,200

69.3%

San Antonio

South Arena
District/Southeast
Denver Heights

4.0%

$111,500

$176,800

-36.9%

Orlando

Audubon Park &
Coytown

5.4%

$307,200

$241,800

27.0%

Cincinnati

Clifton

2.0%

$306,600

$146,400

109.4%

Cleveland

Riverside

3.1%

$221,000

$   56,100

293.9%

Kansas City

Longfellow

5.7%

$251,300

$394,735

-36.3%

Las Vegas

East Paradise

4.9%

$217,510

$276,500

-21.3%

Columbus

Victorian Village

4.7%

$375,800

$156,200

140.6%

Indianapolis

Overlap of Broad Ripple
and Meridian Kessler

5.8%

$334,600

$144,200

132.0%

San Jose

Downtown

1.1%

$553,900

$895,200

-38.1%

Austin

Galindo

3.4%

$463,800

$368,800

25.8%

Virginia Beach
Metro

Lafayette-Winona
(Norfolk, VA)

2.6%

$224,200

$230,200

-2.6%

Nashville

Lockeland Springs

3.1%

$472,700

$266,000

77.7%

Zillow

Zillow is the leading real estate and rental marketplace dedicated to empowering consumers with data, inspiration and knowledge around the place they call home, and connecting them with great real estate professionals. In addition, Zillow operates an industry-leading economics and analytics bureau led by Zillow Group's Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell. Dr. Gudell and her team of economists, data analysts, applied scientists and engineers produce extensive housing data and research covering more than 450 markets at Zillow Real Estate Research. Zillow also sponsors the quarterly Zillow Home Price Expectations Survey, which asks more than 100 leading economists, real estate experts and investment and market strategists to predict the path of the Zillow Home Value Index over the next five years. Launched in 2006, Zillow is owned and operated by Zillow Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:Z and ZG), and headquartered in Seattle.

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i The lack of ACS data on gender identity and sexual orientation means that single LGBTQ people cannot be identified. As a result, areas with high concentrations of LGBTQ singles are absent in this analysis.

 

SOURCE Zillow

For further information: Lauren Braun, Zillow, press@zillow.com